We’ve written before about how appraisal-style valuation methodology–with direct reference to Delaware appraisal cases–is sometimes used in non-appraisal cases. In December 2017, Vice Chancellor Glasscock, of the Delaware Chancery court, handed down Wright v. Phillips, No. CV 11536-VCG, 2017 WL 6539383, at *1 (Del. Ch. Dec. 21, 2017), a case involving the valuation

In a new ruling in the DFC Global appraisal case, about which we’ve posted before, Chancellor Bouchard has now reconsidered his prior award of 7% over the merger price and increased his prior award by an extra 9 cents per share, translating to an additional $12 million in value above his prior ruling.

Our “Valuation Basics” series has focused on the various components of a discounted cash flow analysis under the income approach, which seeks to value a company based on the present value of its projected cash flows.  This post and those to follow in this series will now move away from the income approach

We posted last month about the Delaware Chancery Court’s ruling in Ancestry.com, in which it upheld the growing practice of appraisal arbitrage. The Chancery Court has now rendered its valuation decision in that case, finding the merger price itself to be the most fair measure of stockholder value on a going concern basis. As

The Delaware Supreme Court has scheduled the case of Huff Fund Investment Partnership v. CKx Inc. for en banc review in February 2015.

The Chancery Court rejected the valuation methods proposed by the parties and deferred to the merger price as the only reliable indicator of value. The Chancery Court likewise rejected the shareholders’ argument

Prior posts in our “Valuation Basics” series have examined the various components of the cost of equity capital under the Capital Asset Pricing Model (“CAPM”). In this post we continue our discussion of those components, focusing on the equity risk premium and its modifying coefficient, the beta.

The CAPM has become the Delaware Court of

In a prior post, we explained how the Capital Asset Pricing Model (“CAPM”) has become one of the frequently employed methods used by the Delaware Court of Chancery to calculate the cost of equity for the discount rate in a DCF analysis. In this post, we focus on one specific component of the CAPM:

The purchaser of a company through merger often argues in a subsequent appraisal action that the price paid was too high and that the dissenting shareholder should be paid a lower amount. Tactically, it is important for the purchaser to impress the dissenting shareholder with down-side risk in pursuing the appraisal. The resulting inference of

In a prior post we mentioned the three basic components of a discounted cash flow (“DCF”) valuation analysis — cash flow projections, a discount rate, and a terminal value — and explained how to calculate one of those components, the discount rate. In this post, we tackle another component, the terminal value.

In a typical

The discounted cash flow method, or “DCF”, has become the generally accepted method of valuation in Delaware’s Court of Chancery.  The DCF method seeks to value a company by discounting the company’s projected future cash flows to present value based on the perceived risk of investing capital in that company.  As recently summarized by Vice