JDSupra has published an article discussing recent valuation issues in five states: Louisiana, Georgia, West Virginia, Alaska, and Pennsylvania.

While each decision covered is worth discussion in its own right, a comparative analysis of this kind lends itself to highlighting the similarities and differences between the states.  In particular, how (and if) each state applies

Law360 [$$] ran this piece today, Are Delaware Courts Last To Believe In Efficient Markets?, discussing Delaware Chancery’s Aruba decision, its treatment of the efficient market hypothesis, and the Supreme Court’s upcoming hearing of the appeal, which will take place this Wednesday, March 27, 2019.

We have written on Aruba previously, along with its

The Columbia Blue Sky Blog posted about the speculation surrounding Dell Technologies Inc.’s pending offer to its public Class V trading stock shareholders (DVMT) and the opposition by activist hedge funds with substantial DVMT positions.  Professor Eric Talley compares the challenges facing Dell to the hazards in The Hunger Games.

Vice Chancellor Glasscock issued yesterday this AOL ruling on reconsideration, lowering his prior $48.70 determination to $47.08 — going farther below the $50 merger price — on the basis that he had overvalued one of AOL’s pending transactions in his DCF analysis.

The court prefaced its ruling by expressing its displeasure at both parties

The Delaware Court of Chancery just issued two new appraisal rulings:

  1. Solera (C. Bouchard): the Court awarded merger price less synergies, which comes out to 3.4% below deal price; we have previously reported on the Solera case here; and
  2. Norcraft (V.C. Slights): the Court awarded a premium of 2.5% above deal price,

Although Delaware dominates when it comes to appraisal (as a result of its outsize attractiveness to U.S. companies as a place of incorporation), appraisal is not limited to the First State. As we’ve previously discussed, appraisal regimes also exist in other states including Massachusetts, Arizona, and Nevada. What about the Hawkeye State?

On April 23, 2018, the Delaware Supreme Court affirmed last July’s Chancery court ruling in the Clearwire case.  This decision ends the appeal by Clearwire shareholders looking to overturn the lower court decision finding that Clearwire was worth $2.13 per share, below the $5 merger price. When the Supreme Court, or any appellate court,

CLS BlueSky Blog posts that the Delaware Supreme Court’s recent decision in Dell–and the Delaware appraisal decisions awarding below deal-price in certain appraisal actions–may give cover to Dell Technologies (the Dell of the Dell decision) in its potential rollup of VMware. Dell already owns 82% of VMware stock, according to the post, and may