The Delaware Court of Chancery just issued two new appraisal rulings:

  1. Solera (C. Bouchard): the Court awarded merger price less synergies, which comes out to 3.4% below deal price; we have previously reported on the Solera case here; and
  2. Norcraft (V.C. Slights): the Court awarded a premium of 2.5% above deal price, relying on a DCF analysis and expressly rejecting a valuation based on merger price less synergies.

Both opinions adhered to the Supreme Court’s Dell and DFC rulings, although Norcraft held that despite those decisions, a merger price ruling was not warranted on the facts of that case.  Also, both cases rejected unaffected stock price as a measure of fair value based on their respective records.  The Solera opinion can be found here, and the Norcraft opinion can be found here.

**This firm is one of the counsel of record for petitioners in Solera.

On April 23, 2018, the Delaware Supreme Court affirmed last July’s Chancery court ruling in the Clearwire case.  This decision ends the appeal by Clearwire shareholders looking to overturn the lower court decision finding that Clearwire was worth $2.13 per share, below the $5 merger price. When the Supreme Court, or any appellate court, affirms without discussion or opinion, it provides little guidance for litigants going forward. Here, Clearwire had unique facts – covered in our original post – that set it apart from many other appraisal cases.

 

We’ve written before about how appraisal-style valuation methodology–with direct reference to Delaware appraisal cases–is sometimes used in non-appraisal cases. In December 2017, Vice Chancellor Glasscock, of the Delaware Chancery court, handed down Wright v. Phillips, No. CV 11536-VCG, 2017 WL 6539383, at *1 (Del. Ch. Dec. 21, 2017), a case involving the valuation of business entities not in an appraisal context but rather as the result of a business (and marital) divorce.

Wright concerned a recycling and shredding business composed of three business entities originally 50 percent owned by each of a husband and wife duo. With the parties divorcing in 2013, the business continued until 2015, when the parties reached an impasse and a corporate deadlock ensued. After some litigation, the parties agreed that one would buy out the other; but perhaps unable or unwilling to trust each other’s valuations, the chancery was required to set the value.

Vice Chancellor Glasscock first observed that the business was a going concern, and thus a fair value analysis–the kind invoked by Section 262 of Delaware’s appraisal law–was required. The experts in the case used an “income approach analysis,” which the court accepted and discussed. The Vice Chancellor relied on one of the expert reports as an initial number, and then applied (1) an addition for the tax value of one of the entities tax status as an S corporation rather than as a C corporation; (2) applied a 10 percent marketability discount; and (3) required removal from the valuation any calculation of additional income attributable to discharging the non-continuing partner (what the court referred to as “synergies”).

Tax implications, discounts for lack of marketability, and valuations not including synergies are all issues found in appraisal; little wonder then that the Vice Chancellor cited an appraisal case, SWS, as part of his analysis in this non-appraisal matter. The corpus of appraisal law is likely to continue to provide guidance to Delaware courts–and non-Delaware courts–on valuation issues.

On Monday, Law360 [$$] reported that the stockholders in the Clearwire appraisal action filed their opening brief in support of their appeal of the Chancery Court’s ruling, which found the fair value of Clearwire Corp. to be $2.13 per share, well below the $5 per share deal price paid by Sprint Nextel Corp.  As reported in the article, on appeal, the stockholders argue that the “staggering discount” awarded by the Chancery Court is “virtually unprecedented.”  We have previously posted on the Chancery decision here.  We will continue to monitor the appeal and post on new developments as they arise.

As we previously posted, the Chancery Court appraised the fair value of Clearwire Corp. to be $2.13 per share, substantially below the $5 per share merger price paid by Sprint Nextel Corp in July 2013.  This post will provide a more detailed breakdown of the ruling and the bases for Vice Chancellor Laster’s opinion.

Continue Reading Breaking Down The Clearwire-Sprint Appraisal Ruling

Today the Delaware Chancery Court issued its ruling in the Clearwire case, which included claims for breach of fiduciary duty as well as appraisal arising from its acquisition by Sprint.  We’ll provide a more comprehensive breakdown of the decision in a later post.

In the meantime, as reported today by Reuters, Hedge fund stung by unusual ruling over Sprint-Clearwire deal, the ruling “stands out for a court that rarely finds fair value below deal price, let alone more than 50 percent below.”

Among other factors, the court found that neither side argued in favor of deal price, and so the court did not even consider it but looked only at the respective valuation analyses put forth by each side’s valuation expert.  Given the considerable synergies in this transaction, the court held that the deal price provided an “exaggerated picture” of Clearwire’s value.  The court also noted that the experts’ choice of projections drove 90% of the difference in their DCF valuations.

Today Vice Chancellor Laster issued a new appraisal ruling, Merion Capital LP v Lender Processing Services, pegging the appraised fair value to the merger price.

The court found no reason to depart from merger price given the apparently reliable sale process and reliable projections.  The court performed its own DCF valuation, which came out 4% above the merger price.  Vice Chancellor Laster found that his own valuation’s proximity to merger price gave him comfort as to the reliability of merger price and thus chose not to vary from it in determining fair value.

The court rejected the respondent’s synergies argument — intended to set fair value below the merger price — for being raised too late and unsupported by any evidence.  The decision also includes a thorough and instructive survey of recent appraisal case law.

Vice Chancellor Glasscock issued his valuation decision this week in the BMC Software case, which we have previously blogged about concerning its threshold ruling rejecting any share-tracing requirements and thus allowing appraisal arbitrageurs to proceed with a valuation case. As we have previously reported, Merion Capital was seeking a 45% premium to the merger price, while BMC Software argued that the fair value was actually far below the merger price.

Merger Price Reflected Fair Value in This Deal

In rendering his decision, the Vice Chancellor once again looked to merger price as a measure of fair value, as he did in the Ancestry.com decision. Perhaps most interesting was his discussion of synergies toward the end of the opinion, in which he hypothesized that if Company B, holding a patent on the bow, found it advantageous to acquire Company A, a manufacturer of arrows, “synergies could result from the combination that would not have composed part of the going concern or the market value of Company A, pre-merger,” in which case Company B might value Company A more highly than the market ordinarily would. In this situation the court would be required to deduct any such synergistic value from the merger price. However, in this particular case, the acquisition was not strategic but financial, and while Respondent pointed to tax savings and other cost savings that it claims it would have realized as a private entity, the court refused to discount the merger price for any synergies.

The court further noted that receiving fair value is not necessarily the same as going concern value, and that any tax or other take-private savings may not be subject to exclusion from the awarded price as synergistic, but those savings could indeed be excludable from the going-concern value. The evidence in this case did not demonstrate any specific dollar-per-share value attributable to such savings, so the court refused to so discount the merger price. In a footnote, Vice Chancellor Glasscock said that the requirement to reduce from fair value any “non-speculative increases in value requiring a change in corporate form” was an “artifact of the policy decision to engraft ‘going concern’ valuation onto the explicit language of the appraisal statute itself,” citing Union Illinois.

The court also rejected Respondent’s request to deduct synergies based on take-private cost savings because they required a 23% internal rate of return in their business model to justify the acquisition, which raised the question of “whether the synergies present in a going-private sale represent a true premium to the alternatives of selling to a public company or remaining independent.” Thus, it was unclear whether any alleged going-private savings outweighed the buyer’s rate of return that was required “to justify the leverage presumably used to generate those savings.”

The Court’s DCF Exceeded Merger Price

The parties relied exclusively on their own DCF models, finding a comparable companies or precedent transactions analysis unreliable. Likewise, the court did its own DCF analysis and came up with a $48 per share price, exceeding the $46.25 merger price that it ultimately found to be fair value. The Vice Chancellor said that he was reluctant to use his own valuation and instead deferred to merger price, given the optimism inherent in the management projections; the raging debate within the academic community over the proper equity-risk premium to apply (thus undermining the reliability of his discount rate); and the difficulties in predicting the accurate terminal growth rate, which could be anywhere in between the floor of inflation and GDP (here, the court had picked the midpoint of those two measures in setting its own terminal rate). In this respect, the court’s DCF valuation, which exceeded merger price, was different from that in Ancestry.com, where the court’s own DCF came up just short of the merger price.

Sale Process

In examining the merger process itself, the court found the process to be robust insofar as there were two auctions conducted for several months each, and there were a total of five financial sponsors and eight strategic entities considering the acquisition. There was a go-shop clause, as a result of which the company contacted sixteen bidders — seven financial and nine strategic — which resulted in no alternative offers. And finally, in an arguable blurring of the line between fiduciary duty actions and appraisal rights (a subject on which we’ve posted several times before), the court explicitly looked to the settlement of the class action fiduciary duty litigation as an indication that the process was found to be free of any irregularities or fiduciary duty violations. In particular, the court found significant that the company’s activist investor, Elliot Associates, who had pressured the company to sell, was also forced to conclude that the auction itself was “a fair process.”

Other DCF Valuation Metrics

As to some of the basic valuation metrics (which were used to calculate the court’s own DCF that it ultimately refused to utilize in favor of the merger price):

  • The court adopted a supply-side equity risk premium, finding that it had already been done in Golden Telecom and Orchard Enterprises and is thus indicative of the “Court’s practice of the recent past.” The court found a preference for using forward-looking data as opposed to the historical or the supply-side approach, notwithstanding the continuing debate within academe concerning the more reliable method.
  • The court reaffirmed that inflation is generally the floor for a terminal value, and here, since there was no evidence to suggest that the growth rate should be limited to inflation, the court ultimately chose a growth rate at the midpoint of inflation and GDP, which was 3.25%.
  • The court found it appropriate to include a reasonable offset for the tax associated with repatriating offshore cash, rejecting Petitioner’s argument that the company’s plan to keep that money offshore indefinitely should translate to no offset at all. We have seen this same point argued (and now pending before the court) in the Dell appraisal case as well.
  • As is true of many tech companies, BMC had a sizable stock-based compensation (SBC) policy, which the court found was required to be accounted for, and further found reasonable to treat as an expense, particularly because this practice was expected to continue into the future. The court thus agreed with Respondent’s expert, who treated SBC as a cash expense, as opposed to Petitioner’s expert, who didn’t account for future SBC at all.

While the court seemed to take a jab at Petitioner for being “arbitrageurs who bought, not into an ongoing concern, but instead into this lawsuit,” nothing in this opinion referred back to or otherwise altered its prior ruling allowing appraisal arbitrage to proceed unfettered by a constraint such as the share-tracing requirement that BMC had asked the court to impose.