Does appraisal arbitrage create costly uncertainty for a putative corporate buyer?  In The Cost of Appraisal Rights: How to Restore Certainty in Delaware Mergers, 52 Ga. L. Rev. 651 (Winter 2018), the author argues that the well-established ability to alienate voting interest from equity interest with common stock opened the door to appraisal arbitrage

The possible impact of blockchain based shareholder governance, including shareholder voting, has been a hot topic in recent years. We’ve covered a number of potential intersections between blockchain and corporate governance (including appraisal) before. Professor Christopher Brunor of the University of Georgia reviews a recent scholarly proposal for blockchain based shareholder governance in this recent

The Harvard Business Law Review (whose articles we’ve covered before) has published a piece concerning Delaware allowing blockchain to be used for company stock ledgers. While we have written about blockchain repeatedly, the new HBLR article examines how blockchain-based securities could fundamentally change corporate governance. Using Dell and Dole as examples, the author

As we have previously covered, Delaware has been considering whether to allow Delaware corporations (with Delaware being the site of the vast majority of appraisal litigation) to use blockchain platforms to issue and trade shares.  As of July 21, that has become the law with Delaware’s governor signing a bill allowing blockchain to be used for the maintenance of corporate records, including stock ledgers.  Blockchain is a concept of distributed ledger, as opposed to the centralized ledger system of DTCC.  From JD Supra: “One practical reason for using blockchain technology to track the transfer of corporate securities stems from a long-standing uncertainty surrounding the property rights of investors who ‘ultimately have no identifiable relationship with the corporate issuers of investment securities’ that they purportedly hold.”

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