The Harvard Business Law Review (whose articles we’ve covered before) has published a piece concerning Delaware allowing blockchain to be used for company stock ledgers. While we have written about blockchain repeatedly, the new HBLR article examines how blockchain-based securities could fundamentally change corporate governance. Using Dell and Dole as examples, the author discusses how blockchain can solve delayed settlement and unrecorded transfers issues – issues that can be critical when it comes to determining the entitlement to appraise.

The author notes that blockchain implementation may create value for the economy as a whole but would not necessarily distribute the gains evenly. This issue–effectively a tragedy of the commons–could be resolved through government action. But markets may also play a role. As readers of this blog know, the majority of large U.S. companies are incorporated in Delaware, a state with less than 1 percent of the U.S. population. Part of the reason for that is a market for legal rules–Delaware law, and the Delaware courts, are a more hospitable environment for incorporation than other places. Likewise with blockchain. If early adopters find distributed ledgers result in lower transaction costs – and thus additional investors, more liquidity, easier (and cheaper governance) or similar – this may encourage regulatory reform in states looking to compete with Delaware.  Regulatory reform may, in turn, beget further adopters.

We expect continuing developments with blockchain, and its use with securities, in the future.