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Appraisal Rights Litigation Blog

Challenges for Appraisal Arbitrage?

Posted in Appraisal Arbitrage, August 2016 Amendments

Have the recent Delaware statutory amendments and major Dell decision threatened the appraisal arbitrage strategyBusiness Law Prof Blog (via a guest post) acknowledges that while these two developments do not prevent appraisal arbitrage — indeed, the Delaware legislature rejected a proposal to crack down on arbitrage — they may be part of an overall trend against the strategy, and that those who want to pursue appraisal arbitrage should take action before potential other developments may limit it.

Appraisal arbitrage, as we’ve posted before, is a strategy whereby an investor buys shares of a company after announcement of a merger intending to exercise appraisal rights.  Unlike historical holders, who may have purchased stock for amounts higher than the deal price, the arbitrageur is buying stock already priced with the deal in place, usually at a price much closer to the deal price.  Whether the new Delaware rules will suppress appraisal filings has been a topic of significant debate – we’ve covered pieces about these topics before suggesting they may actually wind up inadvertently increasing appraisal claims.

The Business Law Prof Blog post points out that the fundamental premise of appraisal arbitrage involves the idea of “fungible bulk” – that any particular share of stock is part of the bulk of un-differentiable shares – so that barring a finding that the particular holder voted for the merger, the arbitrageur may seek appraisal so long as enough shares voted against the merger or abstained to “cover” the arbitrageur’s shares and render them eligible for appraisal.

Whether the recent statutory and legal developments actually signal a cautionary flag to arbitrageurs remains to be seen.  The Delaware legislature will first need to be persuaded that its prior determination — that appraisal arbitrage is an accretive strategy that enhances shareholder value — was somehow incorrect.