May 2014

On May 12, 2014, the Delaware Court of Chancery issued its latest appraisal opinion, Laidler v. Hesco Bastion Environmental, Inc., addressing, among other things, the limitations on the use of merger price in an appraisal proceeding.

The petition for appraisal was brought by a former employee of Hesco Bastion USA, Inc. (“Hesco”), which manufactured and sold “Concertainer units” – deployable barriers designed to protect against flooding – in the United States. On January 26, 2012, Hesco was merged into its majority shareholder, the respondent, pursuant to a short-form merger. Immediately prior to the merger, the respondent held 90% of the outstanding equity of Hesco, and the petitioner held 10%. The petitioner refused to accept the $207.50 per share cash consideration offered by the respondent, and instead exercised appraisal rights.

Vice Chancellor Glasscock concluded that the fair value of the petitioner’s shares was $364.24 per share, a 75% increase over the merger consideration. In reaching his conclusion, the Vice Chancellor rejected the respondent’s position that the Court should consider the merger price as persuasive evidence of fair value because it was the result of an arm’s-length negotiation between the controlling shareholder and an independent director. The Court found that it was not an arm’s-length transaction subject to a full market check, but rather a short-form merger consummated by a controlling shareholder who set the merger price. “Under our case law,” the Court stated, “a statutory appraisal is the sole remedy to which the Petitioner is entitled, and to defer to an interested controlling shareholder’s determination of fair value in a transaction such as this would render that remedy illusory.”

Vice Chancellor Glasscock used a direct capitalization of cash flows (“DCCF”) valuation method to determine the fair value of the petitioner’s shares. The Vice Chancellor did not perform a traditional discounted cash flow (“DCF”) analysis because Hesco had not created management projections in its ordinary course of business. The Court relied on the DCCF analysis – which was the sole method applied by the petitioner’s valuation expert and one of the methods applied by the respondent’s valuation expert – determining a normalized figure for annual cash flows in perpetuity and then dividing those cash flows by a capitalization rate. To determine the company’s normalized annual cash flows, the Court averaged the company’s cash flows from the three years preceding the merger. To determine the capitalization rate, the Court subtracted the company’s long-term growth rate (4%) from its weighted average cost of capital (“WACC”) (21.83%). This appears to be the only Delaware case in which the Court based 100% of its valuation on a DCCF analysis.

The Court’s acceptance and application of a DCCF analysis may be significant. The DCCF analysis provides the Court with a methodology for valuing a company where there are no reliable management projections from which to craft a DCF analysis, and where the company is not sufficiently comparable to other companies for the Court to conduct a comparable companies or precedent transactions analysis. Rather than using the merger price as evidence of going concern value, the Court capitalized historical normalized cash flows in perpetuity to independently value the company as a going concern.

The Court’s acceptance of the buildup model to calculate the company’s WACC is also notable. What is the buildup model? The buildup model is similar to the Capital Asset Pricing Model (“CAPM”), except that it adjusts for industry risk by adding an industry-specific equity risk premium rather than using a beta, and also adds a company-specific equity risk premium. In In re Orchard Enterprises, Inc., (Del. Ch. July 18, 2012), then-Chancellor Strine was highly critical of the buildup model, finding that it was not “well accepted by mainstream corporate finance theory” because “its components involve a great deal of subjectivity.” Nevertheless, both parties’ experts used the buildup model in Laidler. The opinion in Laidler, therefore, should not be read as a signal that the Court of Chancery has abandoned the CAPM in favor of the buildup model.