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Appraisal Rights Litigation Blog

Proposed 2016 Changes to Delaware Appraisal Statute

Posted in Dollar Amount of Appraisal Rights Filings, Interest on Appraised Value, Short-Form Merger

A number of amendments to Delaware’s appraisal statute have once again been proposed by the Corporate Council of the Corporation Law Section of the Delaware State Bar Association, the committee that customarily recommends legislative action to Delaware’s state lawmaking body. If certain proposed changes to the Delaware General Corporation Law (“DGCL”) are approved by the Corporation Law Section, they will be introduced to the Delaware General Assembly.

The proposed legislative changes – available here – are intended to (i) set a floor for the number and value of shares asserting appraisal and (ii) permit M&A targets to prepay some or all of the merger consideration to dissenters to avoid the accrual of interest on such prepaid amounts.

  1. Threshold for Appraisal

Under the proposed amendments, the Court of Chancery shall dismiss an appraisal proceeding for a public company, unless (1) the total number of shares entitled to appraisal exceeds 1% of the outstanding shares of the class or series eligible for appraisal, (2) the value of the merger consideration for such dissenting shares exceeds $1 million, or (3) the merger was a short-form merger pursuant to § 253 or § 267 of the DGCL.

To be clear, the legislature has not yet approved or even considered these proposals; we’ll post about any future developments in that regard. Since most appraisal cases already exceed such levels, we don’t anticipate that the thresholds set forth in items (1) and (2) will have a terribly profound impact; indeed, the cost of mounting an appraisal action naturally dissuades small stockholders from doing so.

  1. Prepayment Option

The proposed legislation also permits the surviving company to make a cash payment to dissenters in an amount of its choosing, with interest accruing only on the difference between the amount so paid and the fair value of the shares as determined by the Chancery Court (as well as any interest that had previously accrued on the paid amount as of the effective date of the merger).

Interestingly, while this second proposal would encourage appraisal respondents to prepay significant amounts to stop the interest clock, investors might utilize the opportunity to redeploy such returned capital to their next appraisal case, thus having the unintended effect of increasing the number of appraisal petitions.

It is worth noting that the draft legislation does not include any specific proposals to eliminate or limit appraisal arbitrage. The proposed legislation includes several provisions unrelated to appraisal that are not addressed here.

If ultimately adopted by the Delaware legislature, the legislation would become effective in respect of merger agreements entered into on August 1, 2016, and thereafter.