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Appraisal Rights Litigation Blog

Delaware Chancery Court (Reluctantly) Dismisses Appraisal Challenge Based on Re-titled Stock Certificates

Posted in Appraisal Arbitrage, Consummation of Merger, Continuous Holder Requirement, Notice of Demand for Appraisal, Record Date

The Chancery Court granted summary judgment in favor of Dell against a number of stockholders who duly noticed their appraisal demands but whose stock certificates had been retitled before the effective date of the merger to their own custodians’ nominees. As is typical for an appraisal challenge, DTC certificated the dissenting stockholders’ shares into the name of its nominee, Cede. But the beneficial owners’ custodians then took the added step of directing DTC to retitle the shares to the name of their own nominees, which change took place prior to the consummation of the merger. The court ruled that this ostensive break in record ownership violated the continuous holder requirement and thus disqualified those beneficial owners from proceeding with their appraisal case.

This ruling dismisses almost a million shares from the Dell appraisal case. Shares that were certificated in the name of Cede, without a further name change, are unaffected by this decision and the rest of the claims remain pending before the court. The ruling only affects those holders whose custodians changed the designee out of Cede’s name and into their own nominees’ names. Interestingly, the court found it irrelevant that the funds themselves were unaware of the retitling of their shares, a process which is undertaken by the custodian without the beneficial owner’s knowledge or consent. Thus, Vice Chancellor Laster found that once a shareholder chooses to hold its shares through intermediaries, it assumes the risk that the intermediaries might take an action against its interests.

Vice Chancellor Laster makes very clear that he felt constrained by Delaware case law to reach this result and that “were it up to me,” a better interpretation of the term “stockholder of record” in the appraisal statute would include the DTC participant list (i.e., the brokers and custodians, not just Cede). Under federal law, Cede is not the record holder, the DTC participants are deemed to be the holders, and the Vice Chancellor would have followed federal law if he did not think that Delaware law so clearly deems only Cede to be the owner of record. In fact, he directed much of his opinion to the Supreme Court itself and seems to want to be reversed. The legislature could conceivably take action first, and contemplating that very possibility, the Vice Chancellor also stated that he did not want to be overridden by the legislature and that there should not be a legislative cure to an issue of statutory construction.

The opinion provides a very detailed account of the process by which shares are held in fungible bulk and then re-certificated by DTC, and how Congress directed the SEC to immobilize share certificates through a depository system in response to the unworkable situation that had arisen under the former paper trading framework. The decision also lays out a comprehensive history of the record holder requirement, from 1899 to the present, in the course of which the court touched on appraisal arbitrage: on the one hand, the court said that including the DTC participants would bring greater clarity to the question of how particular stockholders may have voted. But at the same time, the Vice Chancellor made very clear that he did not thereby intend to undercut the practice of appraisal arbitrage, and as a policy matter he did not understand why critics of appraisal arbitrage oppose the transfer of appraisal rights when the commercial marketplace generally favors the transfer of property, including something as likely to result in an assignment of a litigation claim as a defaulted loan.